TIBETAN PLATEAU AND MECHANISM FOR INDO-PAK MONSOONS’ EVOLUTION

M. Akram Anjum

Abstract


The Tibetan Plateau is an enormous block, more than 4500 m above sea level, with a length of 2000 km and a width of 600 km in the west and 100 km in the East. Due to its topography the Plateau serves as a “high level heat source” to control the summer monsoon. This was dramatically simulated in the numerical experiment of Manabe et al (1974). Today, the Tibetan Plateau ringed by the Himalayas drives the monsoon winds that govern the continents climate. In summer, the Plateau acts as a burrier on an over sticking halfway up into the atmosphere. In winter the case is reverse and the plateau acts like a giant ice cube, cools the perched air above, which rushes down of the Plateau toward the Indian Ocean.

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References


Zhiseng, A., Kutzbach, J.E., Prell, W. L. & Porter, S. C. Evolution of Asian monsoons and phased uplift of the Himalaya-Tibetan plateau since Late Miocene times. Nature 411, 62-66 (2001).

Nature News Service, Macmillan Magazines Ltd 2001


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